The return to Turkish delight

In six days, I’ll be jumping on a flight to Istanbul to work on an archaeological dig for a month!

I went to Turkey for the first time in 2012 to work on the excavations at Çadır Höyük and I’m excited to journey back to the lovely town of Peynir Yemez for round two! To say the experience was transformative is an understatement — the number of things I learned during my first season in the field is immeasurable. Previous to working on the dig, my only archaeological experience was absorbed through art history textbooks and the learning curve was steep. Let’s just say it was tough. (note — garden trowels you get at Canadian Tire are not what real-live archaeologists use)

Despite my unarchaeological disposition (which I finally did overcome by discovering my proficiency in archaeological sketching) I fell in love with Turkey — the people, the landscape, the food. It was all so foreign to me but at the same time felt familiar. The world was made smaller to me, in the best possible way.

I can’t wait to go back.

I haven’t written much about my summer at the dig because it happened right before I started The Food Girl in Town and once I landed in Halifax I was too busy to writing about stuffing my face in a new city. I can’t wait to fill you in on the trip and show you how exciting, and delicious,  the central Anatolian planes can be. Just you wait!

For now, sit back relax and enjoy some snaps from my travels around Turkey after the dig in 2012.

Güle güle. (that means see you later! in Turkish)

On the way to the dig — the Anatolian planes of central Turkey are a wealth of rolling hills and archaeological digs.
On the way to the dig — the Anatolian planes of central Turkey are a wealth of rolling hills and archaeological digs.
My view for most of the days at the dig.
My view for most of the days at the dig.
turkey1
The most lovely man squeezing fresh orange juice for me at his cafe in Göreme — he let me try! So refreshing and delicious to go along with my menemen — a traditional Turkish dish with eggs, onion, tomatoes, green peppers and spices. Also known as the best breakfast ever.
Goreme, Cappadocia. The homes of this area are carved out of soft tufa and the rock formations are known all over the world as fairy chimneys.
Goreme, Cappadocia. The homes of this area were carved out of soft tufa and the rock formations are known all over the world as fairy chimneys.
turkey3
The fairy chimneys of Cappadocia in the Goreme Open Air Museum.
turkey5
The remnants of a church in the Goreme Open Air Museum.
Sunrise in Cappadocia.
Sunrise in Cappadocia.
Watching the sunrise from a hot air balloon is probably one of the coolest things to do in Cappadocia.
Watching the sunrise from a hot air balloon is probably one of the coolest things to do in Cappadocia.
turkey7
The amazing carbonite mineral deposits at Pamukkale lead visitors up the mountain to the Greek spa town of Hierapolis. You can hang out in the pools along the way!

turkey14

The beach town of Bodrum.
The beach town of Bodrum.
A Bodrum sunset — the place to party on Turkey's west coast. Lots of clubs, lots of cruise ships, lots of fun!
A Bodrum sunset — the place to party on Turkey’s west coast. Lots of clubs, lots of cruise ships, lots of fun!
turkey8
The Library of Celsus at Ephesus.
turkey10
In front of the Tiled Kiosk Museum at the Istanbul Archaeology Museum.

turkey9

The Blue Mosque in Istanbul during Ramazan.
The Blue Mosque in Istanbul during Ramazan.

If you want to learn more about the awesome work that is going on at Çadır Höyük, you can check out their website to get all the important stuff! 



Leave a Reply